Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Rosettes - Outdoor Wednesday


Rosettes - today's recipe - and a tree decorated for the holiday in a Swedish amusement park.



From the kitchen of One Perfect bite...Rosettes are deep fried, ornate pastries that are formed with a special iron and served during the Christmas holidays throughout Scandinavia and Eastern Europe. They are also a standard feature of the table at Chez Mary. For me, and for many who were children during WWII, they are also "a remembrance of things past". Once the use of the rosette iron is mastered, you'll find them simple to make, wonderful to eat and kind to the family budget. I've just finished making 48 rosettes for less than three dollars. I mention cost not because I think it's of special concern to you, but their simplicity and affordability are what made these cookies known to me. I've spoken in the past, perhaps too much, of war kitchens. Unfortunately, in this season of miracles, I've been discovered by a few people who would like to rewrite the history of kitchens in the United States. We have to live with stupidity, but ignorance drives me crazy because it is avoidable. Like it or not, there has been a huge change our country's eating habits over the past 50 years. Today's cookies are a case in point. When the government has rationed your use of butter, sugar and eggs, you can throw your hands in the air, shake your head and walk away, or choose to emulate those wonderful women of my childhood and make do with what is on hand. The Italian kitchen of Mrs. S, the German kitchen of Hannie and the Swedish kitchen of Mrs. P all made rosettes for Christmas. Their rosettes were different from each other, but they all managed to make a wonderful pastry for pennies. Each made a cookie that reflected their cultural traditions. One used beer, one used anise and one used citrus zest. Using the simplest of batters, they made the culinary traditions of their families shine. I hope you'll give these a try. I've chosen the most basic batter to get you started and I have a few tips to share with you regarding the iron used to form the rosettes. The iron should sit in hot oil for 10 minutes before it is dipped into batter. The batter into which the hot iron is dipped should come no further than 3/4 of the way up the mold. Any higher and you'll not be able to release the cookie at the proper time. I've found that I get the crispest rosettes if I let the batter sit overnight before being used. I also like to sugar the rosettes while they are still warm. While many people use cinnamon sugar, I prefer to use confectioners' sugar because most of my holiday cookies are highly spiced and the rosettes are a nice change. Vanilla and lemon sugar would also be lovely here. That's up to you. Here's the base recipe for one of the nicest Christmas cookies you'll ever have. Many will tell you these keep for a week. Don't believe them. These are best eaten the day they are made. The cookies can be stored in an airtight container for several days, but you'll notice the deterioration of the pastries with each passing day. Try to keep the oil in which the rosettes are fried at a constant temperature. If it is hot enough when the dough goes into the oil you'll find the cookies do not absorb the oil. I know you'll love this one.

Rosettes...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite

Ingredients:
1 cup all-purpose flour, sifted before measuring
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1/2 cup water or flat beer
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 large egg, beaten
Cinnamon sugar or confectioners' sugar for dusting

Directions:
1) Combine milk, water (or beer), sugar, salt and egg in a medium bowl. Whisk to combine. Slowly stir in flour; beat with an electric beater at medium speed until smooth.
2) Heat 2-inches of vegetable oil to 365 degrees F. Heat iron in hot oil for 5 to 10 minutes. Shake off excess. Dip iron into batter until it covers 3/4 of mold's height. Go no higher or batter will not release from mold. As soon as Rosette begins to brown, lift mold and let Rosette drop gently into oil. Turn it over and let reverse side cook for a few extra second.
3) Carefully remove Rosette and drain on paper toweling. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar or confectioners' sugar. Repeat until batter is used. Yield: 48 Rosettes.

Cook's Note: Rosettes can be frozen. Re-crisp in 300 degree F. oven.

This is being linked to:
Outdoor Wednesday - A Southern Daydreamer

41 comments:

tracieMoo said...

I've never seen this but the recipe looks interesting to try :)

Debinhawaii said...

My Mom used to make these and I loved them as a child--so good! ;-)

KathyB. said...

Rosettes! I have my Swedish great-grandmothers' rosette iron , it was given to me by my mother and wrapped in a very, very old bread wrapper, and I have another antique rosette iron I found at an estate sale. I make rosettes every Christmas and find they are delicious within the first 24 hours of frying. There are no leftovers after that! I also offer freshly whipped cream to serve in them too and that is how I prefer them.Well worth the making for sure.You are so right when you say they are kind to the family budget!

I agree with you regarding cooking, budgets, etc. Having fed our family very, very well when we were at the best at poverty level monetarily, I don't think any of us felt poor! One can actually eat very well and fully on a limited income if you are somewhat adept at understanding recipes and adapting...preach on sister, PLEASE!!!!!

charmine. said...

WOW! NEVER expected to see this here.We make this here around christmas time.Have a good day.

Martha said...

These are cookies of my childhood as well -- post war childhood. From my friend with Swedish roots (who also used the cookie press to make Spritz).

And our former church in a town we lived at before coming here, there were several ladies who made these. Masses of them!

I have an iron but feel rosette challenged for I've never made them -- in fact, I found the iron while rummaging for Christmas cookie cutters this week.

Perhaps I should make them -- I like the idea of anise!

Natashya Kitchen Puppies said...

I really want to try these! I added the irons to my wishlist.. Maybe you could post pictures of yours next time you make them! Do you have different patterns?

Hootin' Anni said...

Whoa...these sound terribly sinful. But what the heck, pass one to me! Still hot please.

They're almost like the Mexican pastries I used to make...I can't recall the name...but it starts with a "C". LOLOLOL

George Gaston said...

I'd like to make a reservation at Chez Mary, please! Not only to dinner on these delectable Rosettes, but all the other wonderful things that come out of your creative kitchen. Many thanks Mary, for all the great recipes that you post, also.

Selba said...

The rosettes look pretty :)

Joanne said...

That pastry is gorgeous! It looks just like a snowflake. Perfect for the cold weather we are having.

Liesl said...

YUM! They kinda of sound like the "fried dough" you get at the fair. I love that stuff!

Cathy said...

Your blog is wonderful, Mary. You bring back so many childhood memories for me. Rosettes are a favorite holiday treat.

Foley said...

Mary - Rosettes are the one cookie that reminds me most of Christmas! My Grandma would make them every year, and sorry to say I haven't had them since she passed away.
You make it sound so easy, which I KNOW it's not!! Perhaps I should try the tradition again for my family..you've given me the 'gentle push' I needed!!

A Year on the Grill said...

LOL... My wife and I garage sale for a hobby (cheaper than golf). I see these irons all the time, and we make fun of them as a totally useless item that everyone has for sale (like a bread machine, but don't get me started). Now I have to admit to her that I will be buying everyone i see now...

Oh, and I need a posting for a grand marnier souffle... Have you made one... any tips??? It is for my wife for Christmas Eve, and I will need lots of help (all she asked for)

Mausi said...

Hi Mary,
This Rosettes looks wonderful! It looks beautiful and yummy. I also like the fact that it does not cost much to make. You can buy lots of stuff from store but there is nothing better than home-made cooking!

Alicia said...

My mother in law used to make these. I loved them. What a interesting post. I would love to try them, just need to find the Rosette Iron. I wish I had my mother in laws but she passed away and I've since divorced her son and I lost many of the things that used to belong to her, although many I have kept to give to her grandchildren, my daughter and son.

Lea Ann said...

Mary, Fabulous post. I've never made these and don't have an iron, but will certainly look for one. My mom is a "war kitchen cook" Loved being reminded of the wonderful recipes that came from imagination and inginuity.

Light and Voices said...

The recipe brings back past childhood memories. I haven't ever tried to make rosettes though. Lovely Christmas tree image.
Joyce, IL, USA

Saveurs et Gourmandises said...

Je ne connaissais pas les rosettes.
Je garde la recette.A bientôt.

JLS Hall (Joysweb) said...

That's such a bright and shiny tree! And the rosettes sound truly yummy. We never made them at home, but I have a friend who used to make them every year for her holiday brunch. I always thought they were perfect because they look so much like snowflakes. And they were good to eat, too!

The Blonde Duck said...

I couldn't comment on your blog yesterday b/c my work computer wouldn't let me, but your post Monday made me drool!

And these rosettes are just gorgeous! I'm going to try them!

Joyce said...

Thank you for the helpful hint of heating the iron first. When you price for all those cookies it is a good thing. I have some wonderful cookie recipes that I would like to make but the cost of some nuts are just too high for me to make them. I rarely make Rosette cookies as they are my cousins specialty and since it is the only thing she can make we let her take the ball and run on this one:)
Joyce

Bob said...

I know I'll love it too! Looks wicked good.

Pam said...

I made rosettes in home ec class back in junior high - I think that's the last time I had them. It's time to try them again!

storyteller said...

Pretty tree ... delicious holiday treats would be tasty with tea this afternoon ;-)
Hugs and blessings,
My Outdoor Wednesday

Sweet and Savory said...

I was just told that I don't own my identity. I wonder who owns it. That was from Word Press so I will go to my Blogger account.

I really wanted to tell you that you deserve all the compliments that are coming your way. You have a great blog.

comfycook said...

This is a test to see if I still don't own my blog. Please delete it if it goes through.

Melissa G. said...

ooohhhh yum!

I entered a photo contest on Facebook and we're in 2nd place! I really need my blogging friends help to make it to 1st! Only two days left to vote and we can vote once a day.

Can you help us? Use the link to vote for Christmas Cookies submitted by Melissa Gill...

http://apps.facebook.com/contestshq/contests/13594/voteable_entries

Thank you so so much!

Mary said...

Melissa, I just went over and voted for your photo. The little one is darling.

Marsha's Mpressions said...

Oh those rosettes are just adorable! I'll bet you have a scrumptious Christmas meal! What a lucky family you have. :) Happy Holidays!

Coralie Cederna Johnson said...

Mary!!! What a perfectly wonderful post! Not only is this interesting shared information but your rosettes look scrumptious! They remind me of the donuts my mom used to make in her 1950's kitchen using a sauce pan of oil for the cooking! A little powdered sugar and all was well with the world! Many thanks for sharing! (I love your writing style!) Hugs, Coralie

eileeninmd said...

The rosettes look delicious , lovley tree.

Michael Lee West said...

I've seen rosettes in cooking catalogues and online, but I didn't know the history behind them nor did I have a recipe. They look out-of-this-world good, perfect with morning coffee, noon latte, and my late-night snacks.
XX 00

MonsterMama said...

Waaay out of my league. They sound delicious - I could listen to you all day. Thanks for sharing your stories.

Erica said...

Mary... Thank you for the recipe, I have a rosette iron, this looks so good that I'm going to make this for the Holidays. I haven't made it in years since my Mom [rip] was around. Thanks for sharing!

Jamie said...

Wow! Just wow! Fried. Donut. Sugar. wow! And what beautiful shapes!

jonaha said...

The design looks so delicate and I'm sure it's delicious. Is it similar to a funnel cake?

Mary said...

jonaha, welcome to one perfect bite. I love to see new faces at the table. Rosettes are not like funnel cakes although both are deep fried. Rosettes are crisp and thin. Funnel cakes are limp and thick.

Katy ~ said...

I've only seen rosettes in fancy bakeries, have never tried to make them on my own. They are beautiful pastry, to be visually and gustatory enjoyed.

My Little Space said...

The snow flake Rosettes looks soooo lovely! It's like a blessing to me.... Thank you so much for sharing all these lovely recipes with us! Have a great time, Mary. Bless you.

Anonymous said...

thanks for sharing your post. Now, I am on a hunt for a rosette cast iron. I got to have them!

AddThis

Related Posts with Thumbnails