Friday, June 17, 2011

Linguine with Peas, Garlic and Ricotta Salata - Alice Waters - Week Two of the Fifty Most Influential Women in Food



From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...Like it or not, Alice Waters is one of the people whose voice and ideas have changed the way American people think about food. Her emphasis on fresh ingredients, local farms and artisanal food have led critics within the food industry to label her a zealot and roundly refute her importance to the fresh food revolution in the United States. I must say, at least to the untrained eye, it appears that the industry creates culinary heroes for the sole purpose of tearing them down. Grandma's admonition to "give the devil his due" seems to have fallen on deaf or jealous ears. It's a shame, and, as an observer, I mind the lack of collegiality within the industry. There are children who go to bed at night with empty bellies. Why not address that problem before you eat your young or put your elders on ice flows. Fortunately, outside that small circle of detractors, Alice Waters seems to be doing very well, and while we don't know their names, we do know hers . I like to think of it as karmic justice. Her restaurant, Chez Panisse, is doing well and she is well-received at public appearances. She also grabbed the number two spot on Gourmet's list of the most influential women in the food industry. We could all use a zealot or two in our lives. There is a purity to thoughtful resistance that I find appealing. I may not bend, but I do listen.

I'd also like to extend an invitation to you. A small group of food bloggers is using the Gourmet list of the 50 most influential women in food, found here, to expand their cooking repertoires. Each Friday, participants are free to select any recipe developed by the woman of the week. We'd love to have you join us. If you're interested send me an email and I'll get back to you with particulars. I was really happy to test the recipe that follows. The pasta is wonderful and I know you'll enjoy it. The Silver Fox loved it, though he ate two large servings without a pea making it into his mouth. That's my guy! I'm also including links to two other recipes developed by Alice Waters that have already appeared on my blog. They, too, are terrific. The following bloggers are participating this week's challenge. Be sure to pay these gals a visit. You won't be sorry. They all are great cooks and writers.

Valli - More Than Burnt Toast
Joanne - Eats Well With Others
Taryn - Have Kitchen Will Feed
Susan - The Spice Garden

Linguine with Peas, Garlic and Ricotta Salata...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite courtesy of Alice Waters

Ingredients:
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 large garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 cup fresh baby peas (1 pound unshelled)
1 pound linguine
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped marjoram
1/2 cup crumbled or shaved ricotta salata or feta cheese (about 2 ounces)

Directions:
1) Heat olive oil in a medium skillet. Add garlic and cook over low heat, stirring, until very soft and golden, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat.
2) In a large saucepan of boiling salted water, blanch peas in a strainer until just tender, about 3 minutes. Transfer peas to a bowl.
3) Add the linguine to saucepan and boil until al dente. Drain linguine, reserving 1/4 cup of cooking water. Return pasta to saucepan and toss with garlic oil, peas and reserved pasta water. Season with salt and pepper and sprinkle with marjoram. Top with the cheese and serve at once.
Yield: 4 servings.





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53 comments:

Al Dente Gourmet said...

Mouth-watering linguine, Mary. Gorgeous presentation...it looks so delicate and so full of delicious flavors! Lovely thoughts about Alice Walters :)

Have a wonderful day,

Aldy.

Alessandra said...

I really like Alice Waters, and everyone I know who has eaten in her restaurant says that the food is good, fresh and sincere. The school garden are a wonderful initiative, and so is Slow Food :-)

And so are your linguine!!!!
ciao
Alessandra

The Harried Cook said...

That picture is absolutely beautiful, Mary! You've have done a great job with the linguine... Thanks for sharing another fabulous recipe... :)

thecompletecookbook said...

What a superb looking meal Mary. It's hard to beat the simplicity of a good pasta dish. Have a happy weekend. :-) Mandy

Ana Rita said...

I adore a good pasta dish, and this one is delicious...

Kisses,
rita

Maris(In Good Taste) said...

This pasta is so appealing to me! I will be thinking about it til dinner! Have a lovely weekend!

tandysinclair.com said...

my friend Cindy is an avid fan and I have a book of hers on my wish list - have a super weekend Mary :)

Maria said...

Gorgeous, fresh flavours. This is my kind of a dish!

Priya said...

Seriously am drooling over that wonderful platter, yumm!

Ruth said...

Ooh! What a great dish! I love the veggie ragu you linked to too!

Tracy Wood said...

I think the flavor of pasta is enhanced with all sorts of veggies, we eat pasta like this all the time - topped with seasonal vegetables. Your invite to join the 'cooking club' sounds tempting, but once a week is just too much for me. Where can I find the list of the influential women? Maybe I'll join in here and there throughout the year?!

Pam said...

I am so looking forward to these Friday posts!!!

Sam @ My Carolina Kitchen said...

I often wonder where the "eat fresh and local" movement today would be without Alice. It's amazing how just one person can change everything. Very powerful thought.
Sam

Martha said...

This sounds really good. DH loves simple dressed pastas. I do like Alice Waters and her fresh and local movement but realize that she lives in Calif -- the land where things grow 12 months of the year -- wonderful things grow 12 months of the year -- here on the prairie if we only ate local there would be months and months where the only vegetables you ate would be carrots, potatoes and turnips!!! So I'm grateful for the produce that is shipped in during that time!

bellini said...

Anyone who teaches children in schools to grow veggies long before Jamie Iliver and huis revolution, or supports local farmers and producers and eats seasonally is alright in my boooks. Good chocie for this week Mary!It is interesting to see how vastly different each of our recipes are!

Kim said...

These linguines look perfect for a quick and light meal, perfect for summer!

Jenn @ Youknow...that Blog? said...

YUMMMM it looks fantastic, Mary! I've never heard of Alice Waters, but she sounds like she has the right idea.

Sorry for the lull in visits - was away for a while, and I'm finding it hard to hit my stride again :)

Cindy said...

I think I am her biggest fan. Your linguine looks good enough to eat :)

Linda Starr said...

just how did he skirt around those peas? Ha.

Pegasuslegend said...

Very fresh dish, I love using the ricotta in there with a little pesto this looks grand!

Jenn said...

There always has to be a "scapegoat", right? As long as there are those that support people like Alice Waters, there is still hope for this country :)
The linguine looks wonderful!

meeshiesmom said...

Oh can't wait to make this! Love linguine.
Karen

Emily Malloy said...

This is a beautiful dish!

girlichef said...

Well, I have always been a fan of Waters...and I'm psyched to see that she made the list. This is a fantastic, simple dish...I love the marjoram in there, something I wouldn't have thought to add. I'm so looking forward to this series! =)

yummychunklet said...

That's a great looking dish and a wonderful cook-along idea!

David said...

Mary, Thanks for passing on this recipe. I'm pretty much a carnivore but this dish sounds and looks very satisfying! Take Care, Big Daddy Dave

Kiran said...

Simple, yet a delicious and fresh recipe. Thanks for sharing. I always have a special place for linguine's :)

Parsley Sage said...

Great recipe and some great info about Ms. Waters too. I'm afraid I haven't even heard of her but I'll definitely be checking out that link after commenting because this just looks too good. Mmmm...garlic!

sweetcarolinescooking.com said...

Yum! I would love this pasta. Simple and fresh, but I'm sure full of flavor. Hope you have a wonderful day Mary!

Joanne said...

I never realized how controversial a figure Waters is! I've always just adored her for what she stands for.

I love this linguine recipe and I have to say, I came really close to making it!

Ginny said...

Well, believe it or not, I don't know what ricotta salata is, but I'm assuming it is like feta. This looks very good. I didn't know that Alice Waters had any detractors, what could they possibly have to complain about?

Young Adventures... said...

I love Alice Waters philosophy on food, it makes perfect sense to be. I have checked out her cookbooks from the library and enjoyed them very much. Thanks for sharing this recipe, sounds like a nice light summer meal. Have a lovely weekend Mary!

Valérie said...

What an interesting project, and a great way to brush up on culinary culture. The pasta looks delicious, too!

Wendy Irene said...

Pasta with peas is such a beautiful combination. I often add the peas right to the boiling pasta water to keep things simple. It is wonderful you are celebrating these women. I hope you have a lovely weekend!

Gen said...

A nice plate! Your picture are always colorful and really mouth watering. I like this concept of testing the recipes of influencial women in food, even though I don't know half of them, it's a pretty idea.

Mamatkamal said...

Light and delicious meal! Nice shot Mary! Have a nice evening,
Cheers

PeggyR said...

That sounds very good.

sweetlife said...

lovely linguine..i love alice waters!!

thank you for sharing!!

sweetlife

That Girl said...

I remember when my mom and I went on college tours. We left UC Berkeley early so we could hit up Chez Panisse.

Barbara said...

This is a lovely series, Mary. Alice Waters taught us how it's done. This looks marvelous!

Anna said...

this looks so simple and so delicious! MMM!

Rambling Tart said...

Alice has inspired me so much. :-) I love this beautifully simple dish - so clean, fresh and delicious.

Sue said...

This sounds simply delicious! Have a wonderful weekend!

uno said...

I really like to eat. especially the food. I will try to make at home. thank you, your articles are very helpful

Chiara said...

great recipe Mary, thanks for sharing!have a good weekend,kisses...

Jeanette said...

What a simple, elegant pasta dish - and what a fun event! What better way to get to know someone than through the foods they prepare.

Ben said...

Thank you not only for a great recipe but, perhaps more important, for background on Alice Waters that is very inspiring. Fresh and simple has been the basis of many a great dish!

Ben
http://kissthecook-ben.blogspot.com/

Elaine said...

Happily, Alice Waters is doing extremely well these days despite her detractors and I feel really good when I here that there is another schoolyard garden in the works. With the fresh peas in the market, this is a perfect seasonal recipe.

A Seasonal Cook in Turkey said...

I love all three of your AW recipes, Mary! Can't wait to try them. Also the extra info about her is interesting..

Claudia said...

Your husband has a lot in common with my daughter - who meticulously can pick tomatoes out of anything. As it happens, my kitchen has ricotta salata, fresh peas and linguine so this will get made. It's perfect for the busyness of my weeks. I would love to join you but am crazed with young theatricals at the moment. I crawl home after a day of young-performer-aerobics! Detractors add to the conversation! Shakespeare certainly had his share of them!

My Little Space said...

Mary, thanks for the links! I like green pea but not other family members. I think my boy will definitely the first one have all the beans left on his plate.:o)
Kristy

~~louise~~ said...

I've been wanting to do a post about Alice Waters since I began blogging. I just haven't gotten around to it yet. Perhaps for her birthday next April:)

Your dish looks fabulous. I am a huge fan of ricotta salata. I haven't had it in so long I can't even remember. My grandmother use to make a dish very similar to this. I think she use to add either sausage, salami or Prosciutto. I'm thinking your meatless version may just be more tempting.

Thanks for sharing, Mary...

Lori E said...

I am not familiar with her but it sounds like common sense to me. I don't know why it is such a surprise to the US as the slow food movement has been going on in Italy for quite some time with the same idea. Fresh locally grown food, in season and readily available at markets.
Sounds like the moneymakers in the grocery business are the ones behind the less than friendly welcome.

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