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Saturday, March 12, 2011

Dublin Coddle for St. Patrick's Day



From the kitchen of One Perfect Bite...We'll be attending a St.Patrick's Day party this weekend and I was asked to bring a typically Irish dish to the celebration. Many of the entrees I wanted to make had to be discarded out of hand, because research proved them not to be authentically Irish. Years ago, the Irish diet lacked the diversity found in France and Italy and meals centered on potatoes and dairy products that were, on occasion, extended with small amounts of meat. Armed with that knowledge, I finally decided to make a dish called Dublin Coddle. Coddle is a dish that's much like an English hot pot, though it's cooked more slowly and not allowed to boil. It consists of layers of potatoes, onions and a generous amount of pork that appears in the form of rashers and bangers. The rashers are streaky and unsmoked strips of Irish bacon that taste much like Canadian bacon. The bangers are sausages that are similar in taste to the mildly spiced version that appears on our breakfast tables, though they are less fat and have a smoother texture. Thanks to a Trader Joe's holiday special, I was able to purchase authentic rashers and bangers for my coddle. So, with a wee bit of slicing and dicing I was able to assemble a dish that purportedly was a favorite of Sean O'Casey, Jonathan Swift and James Joyce. Was it literary ambrosia? I beg forgiveness for this next but I just can't help myself, “…and yes I said yes I will Yes.” Actually, Molly, it was just O.K. It certainly could be considered comfort food. Back in the days of imposed abstinence, the dish was made on Thursday nights to finish up pork that could not be eaten come first light the following day. It was primarily a winter dish that was semi-boiled and steamed in the stock used to cook the pork. The coddle was an inexpensive one-pot affair that required only salt, pepper and parsley for seasoning. It was considered to be well with in the means of the working-class Irish, and, while the amount of meat it contained varied from on household to the next, it was a constant on their tables. So, is it any good? While it's perfect for St. Patrick's Day, I wouldn't much bother with it at other times. It's one of those dishes you yearn to try once, then wrap in the mist of memory and put to bed. I'll let you decide for yourself. Here, courtesy of the Accidental Hedonist, is the recipe for Dublin Coddle.

Dublin Coddle...from the kitchen of One Perfect Bite, courtesy of the Accidental Hedonist

Ingredients:
2 quarts of water
1 pound link sausage (Irish bangers or American breakfast sausage)
1 pound thick cut sliced bacon, blanched
3 pounds Idaho potatoes, peeled and cut in 1/4-inch slices
3-4 yellow onions, peeled and sliced
Ground pepper
1 bunch curly parsley, chopped

Directions:

1) Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Bring 2 quarts of water to a boil in a large saucepan.
2) Meanwhile, place bacon and sausages in a large skillet and fry just long enough to lightly color.
3) Add sausages and bacon to boiling water and cook for 5 minutes. Remove meat, slice into bit-sized pieces and reserve in a bowl. Reserve cooking stock.
4) Lightly grease bottom and sides of a Dutch oven or 5-quart casserole. Layer ingredients in the following order until all have been used; potatoes, onion, pepper, parsley, and pork.
5) Pour reserved stock over contents of casserole until ingredients are covered. Water may be used if you run out of stock. Bring casserole to a simmer.
6) Place in oven and cook for 90 minutes or until potatoes are tender. I cover the pot.
7) Serve hot with whole meal bread and butter. Yield: 6 to 8 servings.

You might also enjoy these recipes:
Potato-Leek Gratin - Teeny Tiny Kitchen
Fool Proof Scalloped Potatoes - My Gourmet Connection
Fontina Scalloped Potatoes - The Other Side of Fifty
Crockpot Scalloped Potatoes and Ham - Creatively Domestic
Mushroom Scalloped Potatoes - Pots and Plots
Thyme and Rosemary Au Gratin Potatoes - Wicked Good Dinner
Perfectly Cheesy Potatoes Au Gratin - Deep South Dish
Chicken, Mushroom and Potato Hot Pot - Caviar and Codfish
Dublin Coddle - Home Cooking Rocks
Irish Cooking:Dublin Coddle -Chef Mom

This post is being linked to:
Pink Saturday, sponsored by Beverly at How Sweet the Sound.

Cuisine Kathleen, St.Patrick's Day Blog Crawl

62 comments:

alison said...

sounds good!:)

Spoon and Chopsticks said...

I don't think I've tried this before. Looking at the way you've done, it looks great!

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

I saw a similar dish yesterday, now I am not sure which one I want to cook for St Patrick's night LOL. Diane

Ah Tze said...

I like to read your post, there is so much new information in your cooking! Have a great weekend!

Three-Cookies said...

I agree with your conclusion! This explains why this dish is relatively known!

elle marie said...

I've honestly never tried Dublin Coddle before..what an authentic way to celebrate St. Patty's... sorry I missed quite a few of your posts.. it's so devastating what is happening here in Japan...I'm really scared this time...

Red Nomad OZ said...

I thought it was just us Aussies who called sausages 'bangers'!! There's another word I won't have to translate on my blog!!

Have a great weekend!!

Chiara said...

A special dish for a special day,sounds good Mary! A hug....

Jeannie said...

Sounds like a great dish!

paula MARIANA said...

Mary this looks and sounds delicious , is a pleasure visit your blog and learn this recipes with you.

Kisses and have a great weekend!!!

Wanda Metcalf said...

I can't wait!! I just heard this week that we are getting a trader Jo's Right now I have to drive 2 1/2 hours to the closest one. But I do it because of my medical dietary needs. I plan on going today so I am going to pick up everything to make this it really looks good and I think I can eat it. The sausage may be a problem I will have to see what is in it.

I am happy to have an authentic dish that is recommended!

Linda Starr said...

Comfort food isn't a bad thing. wish they'd get a trader joes down here.

Nisrine M. said...

I've tried a variety of Irish dishes thanks to my MIL but never this one. I'd like to give it a go. It looks delicious.

Suman Singh said...

I wasn't familiar with this dish but it looks comforting and delicious! Have a nice weekend!

Tanna at The Brick Street Bungalow said...

I've learned aobut Dublin Coddle today! Mary, I so enjoy your writing! I know I say that often, but I can't help but say it again. Thank you. Blessings ~ Tanna

bellini valli said...

I have never heard of a coddle Mary, but I am with you about being authentic. Our traditional corned beef and cabbage is not Irish although perhaps it has become synonomous with the day so is "new Irish".

Tasha said...

No St. Patrick's Day festivities for me this year, so I won't be cooking up any St. Patrick's Day fare, but I still enjoyed hearing about this authentic Irish dish!

Katerina said...

Very informative post Mary! It is true that dishes looked very extraordinary back at those days today are considered ok, because of the diversity of ingredients available and the knowledge of other countries' meal that enrich our daily table.

Clint said...

Your presentation is sensational. How you can make it look so good with such simple ingredients I do not know. Have a wonderful weekend, Mary!

A Canadian Foodie said...

My dad is first generation Canadian from Ireland and I have not cultural Irash food traditions. I have been on the search for years and am consistently drawn to these kinds of dishes. Looks so lovely!
I have been neck deep in the throws of planning a local food conference here within slow food and have not posted for three weeks. Important work. Time well spent: BUT...I have not read, written, cooked and I miss my life and reading YOU!
I am catching up slowly!
:)
Valerie

Soumya Vineeth said...

Lovely and simple dish!

lena said...

this dish is realtively new to me but i'm sure your guests will enjoy this very much!

tasteofbeirut said...

I really appreciate what you have done and the research that went into it. My Irish neighbor would be thrilled by this dish and I will show it to her (she is actually American of Irish descent). Hope you have a great time and weekend!

Claudia said...

You know you're sending me to Trader Joe's. If Sean O'Casey loved it, I need to give it a go. Maybe adding more sausage to spice things up?

kitchen flavours said...

Thank you for sharing the interesting info. Even though this is a one time tried and 'wrap it up', it does look good!

Harika's Kitchen said...

Wow delish. You are really an excellent cook. Your dishes are very unique.

Karen Harris said...

All of my favorite things in one pot. . . yum! Your friends are going to love this at the party.

Carol @ There's Always Thyme to Cook said...

Looks delicious, even if it is a once in blue moon kind of dish!

Parsley Sage said...

Jonathan Swift, you say? As long as there's no babies in it...

What a perfect Irish din din. Thanks for sharing!

Elaine said...

I have never heard of a coddle before. I so appreciate your honesty on how you like the recipes. I hope you have a great time at the St. Patrick's day party!

crustabakes said...

That sounds so warm, inviting and delicious! happy st pat's day to u!

Anna A. said...

So interesting about this dish (and others not being authentically Irish - were they made up by Irish Americans?) Have a fantastic weekend!

Cathy said...

I haven't seen this dish before, Mary. It is basic, hearty and filling and I'm sure very tasty on a cold, winter evening.

Big Dude said...

Looks good Mary and this is the second of these I've seen. This is really my kind of dish.

SKIP TO MALOU said...

I have very limited Irish dishes in my list. Dublin Coddle is a good dish to add. Time to pitch my old shepherd's pie haha.
thanks Mary and I hope you have a wonderful weekend.

xo,
Malou

StephenC said...

I love not only your creativity, but your writing style. I think coddle comes under the category of "put whatever you have in it" as long as it's potatoes and sausage!

Angela said...

This looks lovely. It almost makes me want to celebrate St. Patrick's Day (working with adolescents has pretty much ruined the holiday for me - preteen boys will pinch the heck out of you without bothering to check your wardrobe choices).

PeggyR said...

This looks really good!

scrambledhenfruit said...

This looks like a perfect authentic comfort food dish for St. Patrick's Day. Very interesting!

James said...

Oh wow, this looks fantastic. I'm so glad I saw your post just in time for St. Patties. Thanks!

Design Wine and Dine said...

Well, it looks super cool and after reading your post, I feel like I just had a bowl!

Interesting that it's not allowed to boil - I get it.

Fun dish for the day for sure! :) Thanks Mary

lostpastremembered said...

Mary, this would make a lot of men very very happy. I can see that it wouldn't exactly be inspiring but good earthy food for the world weary irish.

Victor said...

This is a dish that I'm not familiar at all. Thanks for the terrific explanation. It looks appetizing and colorful.

Cooking Creation said...

I've never heard of this dish until now. It looks and sounds really good! Thanks for sharing :)

Biren @ Roti n Rice said...

It sounds pretty good abd easy to make too. I've gotta find a recipe for St Patrick's Day. Have a good weekend!

Angela said...

You are getting my Pink Saturday plug this week:) I was glad to see you on the list; you always make me hungry.

yummychunklet said...

Interesting! I've never heard of a coddle. It looks tasty!

LV said...

I have had the pleasure of tasting this dish. It really sound good. Of course, anything you share would be great.

Ginny said...

I couldn't find a place to comment on your latest post above, so here I am! I make something very similar to this coddle, but use kielbasa. It is so good, sometimes I add cabbage. In perusing your recipes on top, I was intrigued by four farls,but the best treat about that was reading about your aunt Maude. How I would have loved to spend just one day visiting with her, just listening!!

Ginny said...

I see you have comment approval, I hope nothing bad has happened! That's never a good sign when someone switches to it.

Tammy said...

What a wonderful post! And your St. Patrick round up in your following post is fabulous!
Have a wonderful holiday, Mary!

xx,
Tammy

nanny said...

You are a wealth of knowledge....we are so lucky to have you, a click away!

That Girl said...

It's like bangers and mash but unmashed!

Michelle said...

This looks nummy! Def going to try!

Gloria said...

This look really nice Mary! gloria

penny aka jeroxie said...

I am keeping this for winter... just round the corner for us :)

Deanna said...

Oh Heavens! I am really going to have to try this. I just told hubby that I am going to the grocery store to buy Irish bangers....!!

Happy Pink Saturday
Deanna :D

Happier Than a Pig in Mud said...

This looks great Mary, something a little different than CB&C! Happy St. Pat's Day-enjoy:@)

Beverly said...

Mary, you teach me new things all of the time. I had not heard of this dish before now, but I suspect my husband might like it.

Happy Pink and Green Saturday.

FABBY'S LIVING said...

I'm your newest follower, as I am too a lover of good food and cooking! I will soon try this new recipe, Dublin Code. Thank you for sharing such great ones!
Hope you visit me, I'll be delighted!
HAPPY St. Patty's Day.

FABBY

Gail @ Faithfulness Farm said...

Mary--this looks wonderful. Your post was so informative and I plan to make this soon :)

Blessings!
Gail

Kathleen said...

My Irish aunts used to make this. Yours looks delicious!
Have fun at the party, and thanks for linking up to the blog crawl.

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